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Massena PD Public Record: P.M. Edition

First published: September 23, 2014 at 7:37 pm
Last modified: September 23, 2014 at 7:37 pm

BENCH WARRANT - MASSENA - Village police picked up Cindy M. Alguire, 44, of 345 East Orvis St., Apt. 2, Massena, on a bench warrant signed by St. Lawence County Court for an alleged violation of her release under the supervision of the probation department on a felony count. She has been charged with petit larceny and two counts of second-degree criminal contempt since being placed under probation supervision, according to a uniform court report. She was arraigned on the warrant by St. Lawrence County Court Judge Jerome J. Richards and sent to the St. Lawrence County Jail, Canton, with no bail set.

BENCH WARRANT - MASSENA - Village police picked up Blake W. Angus, 23, of 1641 River Road, Snye, Que., on a bench warrant at 3:22 p.m. Tuesday following a traffic stop on East Hatfield Street. Angus was a passenger in a vehicle being operated by Marie S. Lazore, 33, of Hogansburg. The arrest warrant on a third-degree unlawfully fleeing a police officer in a motor vehicle charge had been signed by the Bombay town justice on Nov. 12, 2013. Angus was turned over to St. Regis Mohawk Tribal Police for transport to an arraignment in local court.

AGGRAVATED UNLICENSED OPERATION - MASSENA - Village police charged Marie S. Lazore, 33, of Hogansburg with third-degree aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle and ticketed her for speed in zone at 3:22 p.m. Tuesday following a traffic stop on East Hatfield Street.

INADEQUATE MUFFLER - MASSENA - Village police ticketed Jason J. Malone, 36, of Massena for operation of a vehicle with an inadequate muffler at 1:54 p.m. Tuesday following a traffic stop on Grove Street.

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Looking deeper: Experts analyze NY21 attack ads

First published: September 23, 2014 at 12:42 pm
Last modified: September 23, 2014 at 5:24 pm

WATERTOWN — A swanky city loft, a barn, a senior center, ominous voices and unflattering pictures — this year’s crop of political attack ads is fairly typical, though there are some facts and nuances worth noting, according to experts at Syracuse University.

Both major party candidates in the race for New York’s 21st Congressional District — Democrat Aaron G. Woolf and Republican Elise M. Stefanik — have released ads attacking each other for their positions on Social Security.

Those ads, “Storming Out” from Mr. Woolf and “Protect” from Ms. Stefanik, are pretty standard for campaigns around the country, although there are some things about Ms. Stefanik’s ad that make it atypical, according to Shana Gadarian, professor of political communication at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs.

Ms. Stefanik’s ad uses her position on Social Security to try to “wedge away” support from Mr. Woolf by using gender stereotypes to her advantage on an issue where Democrats are usually perceived as stronger.

“There are all these stereotypes that go along with being a female candidate. One of them is that you’re more caring and that you’re better for vulnerable populations, including the elderly,” Ms. Gadarian said. “So she’s doing something really smart. She’s using stereotypes to her advantage and she’s going after Democrats on an issue that they typically are better on, or are seen as better on.”

But there are some inconsistencies in Ms. Stefanik’s ad, according to Eric Kingson, a professor of social work at Syracuse University who has lent his imprimatur to the Woolf campaign in the past.

Ms. Stefanik’s ad references a $3,287 cut in Social Security that would result if Mr. Woolf’s proposals for the pension program are put into place.

In August, Mr. Woolf attacked Ms. Stefanik for using the word “modernize” as a code word for privatizing Social Security and Medicare — a charge Ms. Stefanik later refuted, saying she wanted to make changes to the program to ensure its longevity.

Mr. Woolf said he would make no changes to Social Security, whose primary source of funding is projected to run dry by 2033, but would instead shore up the program by working to grow the economy — an approach John L. Palmer, dean emeritus of the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University and a former public trustee for Medicare and Social Security, called “not responsible” because it would not be enough to bolster Social Security on its own.

In the intervening weeks, Mr. Woolf has put forward additional proposals to keep Social Security solvent, including increasing the federal minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, passing the Paycheck Fairness Act, and closing tax loopholes for wealthy individuals and corporations.

According to Mr. Kingson, the $3,287 figure used in the Stefanik ad correlates to a projection about what would happen to Social Security if Congress fails to act in any capacity to support the program made by the Social Security Board of Trustees.

According to Mr. Kingson, Ms. Stefanik’s attack ad is “disingenuous” because it exaggerates Mr. Woolf’s position and fails to account for some of the cuts that would inevitably result if some of Ms. Stefanik’s proposals, including raising the retirement age for future generations and using a chained-consumer price index to account for inflation, are enacted.

Mr. Woolf’s ad misses the mark on taking Ms. Stefanik to task for her Washington, D.C. connections because it tries to incorporate too many messages into a 30-second spot, according to Ms. Gadarian.

“In a 30-second ad there may be too much going on,” Ms. Gadarian said. “I can’t tell what I’m supposed to take from this. Is it that she’s an outsider? Or that she doesn’t have a position? Or that she only cares about the party and not the people? So I’m sure exactly what I’m supposed to get from this ad.”

A third ad, sponsored by the National Republican Congressional Committee, is effective in using an indirect approach to portray Mr. Woolf as an outsider from Manhattan, with creepy crawlies in the kitchen of the Brooklyn businesses he co-owns, Ms. Gadarian said.

“It’s not so explicit to say that he’s dirty, that he’s a dirty politician, but it’s to say, ‘Oh, he’s different and there’s something kind of unclean about this race that he’s running,’” Ms. Gadarian said.

The ad, “The Get Together,” features three of what the producers imagine are Mr. Woolf’s closest friends discussing the candidate’s troubles with health code violations at Urban Rustic and The Lodge, a grocery store and restaurant Mr. Woolf co-owns in Brooklyn.

Though both businesses now have A-ratings from the Department of Health, the ad links Mr. Woolf to a general feeling of unease by associating him with the “roaches and rats” mentioned in the ad.

It capitalizes on that disgust by making it seem as though Mr. Woolf is attempting something underhanded by seeking to become a representative for an upstate congressional district.

Mr. Woolf, a documentary filmmaker, owns a home in Elizabethtown.

Ms. Stefanik, a former White House policy adviser, lives in Willsboro. She works at her family’s plywood distribution company, which is headquartered in Albany County, outside the district.

While reports show that the Democratic Congressional Committee has outraised the NRCC, DCCC-sponsored ads are yet to be seen in district.

This could be the result of a recent WWNY TV-7/Siena College poll that shows Mr. Woolf trailing Ms. Stefanik by 13 points, according to Ms. Gadarian.

“National party organizations want to put their money where it will be the most useful and to the extent that your candidate, in the latest polling, is down by double digits, its unclear that that’s the most useful place for it,” Ms. Gadarian said.

In May, the Associated Press reported that DCCC reserved $800,000 in TV advertising time at stations in or near the district. Those reservations do not necessarily mean that ads will run, but if Mr. Woolf shows some momentum in the polls, that could change, according to Ms. Gadarian.

“The better you do in the polls, the more money the national party gives to your campaign individually, and so then you can run more ads and you start to do better, so there’s kind of this momentum aspect,” she said.

On Tuesday, Roll Call reported that House Majority PAC — a Democratic political action committee — cancelled a $300,000 TV ad buy in the district.

To view “Storming Out,” visit: http://wdt.me/YhKRau

To view “Protect,” visit: http://wdt.me/9ST78J

To view “The Get Together,” visit: http://wdt.me/KPb6Jt

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North Country Savings Bank announces CEO will retire in late 2016

First published: September 23, 2014 at 5:05 pm
Last modified: September 23, 2014 at 5:20 pm
DAVID C. SWANSON

CANTON - North Country Savings Bank Chairwoman Dr. Patricia Mahoney has announced the anticipated late 2016 retirement of David C. Swanson, president/CEO.

Mr. Swanson, president/CEO since 1989, began his career at North Country Savings Bank (then Canton Federal Savings and Loan) in December 1973. At retirement, Mr. Swanson’s career at the bank will have spanned nearly 43 years.

In conjunction, the Board of Trustees is pleased to announce that at its December 2014 meeting, they will elect Theresa A. Phalon, current senior vice president of Retail Banking, to the Board of Trustees. Additionally, Mrs. Phalon will be elected as president of North Country Savings Bank at the bank’s annual meeting in January 2015. Upon Mr. Swanson’s retirement, Mrs. Phalon will assume the responsibilities of CEO. An MBA graduate of Clarkson University, Mrs. Phalon began her career at the bank in April 1987. Mr. Swanson will remain as CEO until his retirement and will continue to hold a seat on the Board of Trustees.

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Stefanik endorsed by Independence Party as Doheny gets judgeship nomination

First published: September 23, 2014 at 9:44 am
Last modified: September 23, 2014 at 1:23 pm

WATERTOWN — The state Independence Party today endorsed congressional candidate Elise M. Stefanik.

Ms. Stefanik, a former White House policy adviser from Willsboro, had already secured the Republican and Conservative Party nominations in the race for New York’s 21st Congressional District.

Ms. Stefanik is running to replace Rep. William L. Owens, D-Plattsburgh, who is not seeking re-election.

Also in the race are Democrat and Working Families Party candidate Aaron G. Woolf and Green Party candidate Matthew J. Funiciello.

“I am honored to accept the Independence Party nomination,” Ms. Stefanik said in a news release. “I’m committed to working with leaders across our District to unite the Republican, Conservative and Independence Party to ensure a new generation of leadership representing the North Country in Washington.”

Thomas S. Connolly, the vice chairman of the state Independence Party, endorsed Ms. Stefanik in a statement.

“We are proud to support Elise’s candidacy for the 21st District,” Mr. Connolly said. “Since announcing her campaign, Elise has worked tirelessly to earn the trust of voters district wide, and we are pleased she will be appearing on the Independence line this November.”

The party had previously endorsed Matthew A. Doheny, a Watertown investment fund manager who Ms. Stefanik defeated in the June Republican primary.

According to the blog State of Politics, the state Conservative Party nominated Mr. Doheny for a judgeship in Brooklyn. The same party rejected Mr. Doheny’s bid for the party nomination for the 21st district seat, insuring Ms. Stefanik will appear on that line.

New York state makes it difficult to get off a party line once a candidate is on it. The only legal way, short of a court order, is by the death of the nominee or the nominee obtaining a nomination for another elective post, which allows his or her removal from the ballot. The only nominations available in the state at this point are Supreme Court judgeships.

Calls to Mr. Doheny and Independence Party chairman Frank M. MacKay went unanswered Tuesday morning.

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County Democrats to honor Tom and Sallie Brothers at fall dinner; Hochul to speak

First published: September 23, 2014 at 11:55 am
Last modified: September 23, 2014 at 11:55 am

CANTON — St. Lawrence County Democratic Committee Chairman Mark Bellardini is pleased to announce that lt. governor candidate Kathy Hochul has accepted his invitation to be the keynote speaker for their fall dinner to be held on Oct. 10 at SUNY Canton.

The former congresswoman will share in honoring the committee’s 2014 Silas Wright Award recipients, Sally and Tom Brothers, Norfolk.

Attendance is by advance reservation only. Anyone interested in attending who is not currently on the committee’s mailing list may make inquiries to slcdemdinner@gmail.com. Tickets are $50 per person for dinner. Information on a pre-dinner VIP reception with elected representatives is available by contacting the above email address.

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NYSP Public Record

First published: September 23, 2014 at 9:54 am
Last modified: September 23, 2014 at 9:54 am

CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE - NORFOLK - Massena-based state police charged Tammy L. Wray, 38, of Norfolk with second-degree aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle - three or more suspensions and seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance following a traffic stop at 1:52 a.m. Tuesday on River Road in the town of Norfolk.

PROPERTY DAMAGE ACCIDENT - MOIRA - State police investigated a number of property damage accidents around the region on Monday. Among those:

• Debra Ann Mason, 59, of Brushton at 8:53 p.m. on Route 11, near High Street, in the town of Moira.

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Massena PD Public Record

First published: September 23, 2014 at 8:01 am
Last modified: September 23, 2014 at 8:01 am

COUNTY COURT WARRANT - MASSENA - Village police picked up Cindy M. Alguire, 44, of 345 East Orvis St., Apt. 2, Massena, on a bench warrant issued by county court at 9:43 p.m. Monday for an alleged violation of her release under probation supervision. She was transported to the St. Lawrence County Jail, Canton, pending an appearance in county court.

SPEEDING - MASSENA - Village police ticketed M.L. Manchester III, 18, of North Raquette River Road, Massena, for speed in zone at 3:22 p.m. Monday following a traffic stop on East Hatfield Street.

SUSPENDED REGISTRATION - MASSENA - Village police ticketed Elizabeth M. Gollinger, 26, of 4 Ripley Ave., Apt. A, Massena, for operation of a vehicle with no insurance and a suspended registration following a traffic stop at 2:35 p.m. Monday on East Orvis Street.

UNINSPECTED MOTOR VEHICLE - MASSENA - Village police ticketed David P. Neciafe, 26, of Proctor Avenue, Ogdensburg, for operation of an uninspected vehicle at 1:08 p.m. Sunday following a traffic stop on Main Street.

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Potsdam PD Public Record

First published: September 23, 2014 at 7:24 am
Last modified: September 23, 2014 at 7:24 am

INADEQUATE HEADLIGHTS - POTSDAM - Village police ticketed William S. Yette, 19, of Potsdam for operation of a vehicle with inadequate headlights at 12:14 a.m. Monday following a traffic stop on Maple Street.

CELL PHONE - POTSDAM - Village police ticketed Brittany M. Godreau, 24, of Champlain for use of a mobile phone while operating a motor vehicle at 3:58 p.m. Monday following a traffic stop on Lawrence Avenue.

The Police Blotter

Monday, Sept. 22, 1014

0014 Traffic stop completed. Ticket issued.

0022 Potsdam Rescue dispatched to a call.

0250 Traffic stop completed. Verbal warning issued.

0402 Potsdam Rescue dispatched to a call.

0738 Traffic stop on SUNY Potsdam campus. Verbal warning issued.

0837 Traffic stop on Elm Street. Verbal warning issued.

0931 Traffic stop on Lower Pine Street. Verbal warning issued.

1139 Mountain bike turned in that was found on Washington Street by the railroad tracks.

1153 Traffic stop on Lawrence Avenue. Verbal warning issued.

1411 Traffic stop on Lower Pine Street. Verbal warning issued.

1434 Traffic stop on Maple Street. Verbal warning issued.

1443 Traffic stop on Maple Street. Verbal warning issued.

1504 Traffic stop on Clarkson Avenue. Verbal warning issued.

1522 Equipment inspection completed for a subject.

1646 Handicap parking permit issued to a subject.

1819 Potsdam Rescue dispatched to a call.

1822 Potsdam Rescue dispatched to a call.

1842 Equipment inspection completed for a subject.

1904 Traffic stop on Market Street. Verbal warning issued.

1947 Received a report of suspicious activity on Racquette Road.

1952 Dispatched Potsdam Rescue to a call.

1958 Dispatched Potsdam Rescue to a call.

2104 Dispatched Potsdam Rescue to a call.

2215 Dispatched Potsdam Rescue to a call. Patrols also responded.

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